Rédigé le 1 janvier 2018 à 12:00 par , publié dans Non classé.

Flávia Viana Ferreira, Eric Roberto Guimarães Rocha Aguiar, Roenick Proveti Olmo, Karla Pollyanna Vieira de Oliveira, Emanuele Guimarães Silva, Maurício Roberto Viana Sant'Anna, Nelder Figueiredo de Gontijo, Erna Geessien Kroon, Jean-Luc Imler, João Trindade Marques: The small non-coding RNA response to virus infection in the Leishmania vector Lutzomyia longipalpis. Dans: PLoS Negl Trop Dis, 12 (6), p. e0006569, 2018, ISSN: 1935-2735.

Résumé

Sandflies are well known vectors for Leishmania but also transmit a number of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). Few studies have addressed the interaction between sandflies and arboviruses. RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms utilize small non-coding RNAs to regulate different aspects of host-pathogen interactions. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is a broad antiviral mechanism in insects. In addition, at least in mosquitoes, another RNAi mechanism mediated by PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) is activated by viral infection. Finally, endogenous microRNAs (miRNA) may also regulate host immune responses. Here, we analyzed the small non-coding RNA response to Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection in the sandfly Lutzoymia longipalpis. We detected abundant production of virus-derived siRNAs after VSV infection in adult sandflies. However, there was no production of virus-derived piRNAs and only mild changes in the expression of vector miRNAs in response to infection. We also observed abundant production of virus-derived siRNAs against two other viruses in Lutzomyia Lulo cells. Together, our results suggest that the siRNA but not the piRNA pathway mediates an antiviral response in sandflies. In agreement with this hypothesis, pre-treatment of cells with dsRNA against VSV was able to inhibit viral replication while knock-down of the central siRNA component, Argonaute-2, led to increased virus levels. Our work begins to elucidate the role of RNAi mechanisms in the interaction between L. longipalpis and viruses and should also open the way for studies with other sandfly-borne pathogens.

BibTeX (Download)

@article{ferreira_small_2018,
title = {The small non-coding RNA response to virus infection in the Leishmania vector Lutzomyia longipalpis},
author = {Flávia Viana Ferreira and Eric Roberto Guimarães Rocha Aguiar and Roenick Proveti Olmo and Karla Pollyanna Vieira de Oliveira and Emanuele Guimarães Silva and Maurício Roberto Viana Sant'Anna and Nelder Figueiredo de Gontijo and Erna Geessien Kroon and Jean-Luc Imler and João Trindade Marques},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pntd.0006569},
issn = {1935-2735},
year  = {2018},
date = {2018-01-01},
journal = {PLoS Negl Trop Dis},
volume = {12},
number = {6},
pages = {e0006569},
abstract = {Sandflies are well known vectors for Leishmania but also transmit a number of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). Few studies have addressed the interaction between sandflies and arboviruses. RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms utilize small non-coding RNAs to regulate different aspects of host-pathogen interactions. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is a broad antiviral mechanism in insects. In addition, at least in mosquitoes, another RNAi mechanism mediated by PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) is activated by viral infection. Finally, endogenous microRNAs (miRNA) may also regulate host immune responses. Here, we analyzed the small non-coding RNA response to Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection in the sandfly Lutzoymia longipalpis. We detected abundant production of virus-derived siRNAs after VSV infection in adult sandflies. However, there was no production of virus-derived piRNAs and only mild changes in the expression of vector miRNAs in response to infection. We also observed abundant production of virus-derived siRNAs against two other viruses in Lutzomyia Lulo cells. Together, our results suggest that the siRNA but not the piRNA pathway mediates an antiviral response in sandflies. In agreement with this hypothesis, pre-treatment of cells with dsRNA against VSV was able to inhibit viral replication while knock-down of the central siRNA component, Argonaute-2, led to increased virus levels. Our work begins to elucidate the role of RNAi mechanisms in the interaction between L. longipalpis and viruses and should also open the way for studies with other sandfly-borne pathogens.},
keywords = {Animals, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Insect Vectors, Leishmania, ncRNA, Psychodidae, RNA, RNA Interference, Small Interfering, Untranslated, Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus, Viral},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {article}
}